Adhesiolysis

At the Vital Health we have successfully treated hundreds of patients with severe adhesions, and for some their surgery was not only life changing but life saving. Our adhesion patients are offered the same ongoing follow-up care as our endometriosis patients.

What are adhesions?

Adhesions are bands of scar tissue that form between adjoining organs and structures, causing them to fuse together. Adhesions can be thin like cobwebs or thick and dense like hardened glue. Adhesions can result from disease (such as endometriosis), infection (such as pelvic inflammatory disease), injury (such as following abdominal surgery) or may have no known cause (idiopathic adhesions).

AdhesionsWhen pelvic adhesions occur they can cause a range of symptoms depending on the organs and tissues that are involved. If the ovaries are involved by scarring or are adhered to the pelvic side walls, the presence of a cyst in the ovary can cause the adhesions to stretch, resulting in a painful, pulling sensation. If the intestines are involved by adhesions, this may result in severe cramping pains due to restricted motility of the gut, and if a section of bowel is constricted by an adhesion, partial or complete bowel obstruction can result, causing severe pain, nausea and vomiting, constipation and diarrhea. In severe cases of adhesions the pelvis may become “frozen” by extensive dense adhesions, fusing the bladder to the uterus, the uterus to the large bowel, and the ovaries and tubes to the bowel, pelvic sidewalls and uterus. In rare cases the entire abdominal cavity, containing the reproductive organs and intestines, will be obliterated by severe adhesions, distorting the pelvic anatomy and making it impossible for the surgeon to identify the pelvic organs without first conducting an extensive and painstaking dissection of the adhesions.

I have been dealing with this problem for 27 years. I have tried not to let it slow me down but as I age it does get a little more difficult. I feel really encouraged that there is really a better answer for me than “you need to live with it”.
-Carolyn T.

How are adhesions treated?

There are no non-invasive medicines or treatments that destroy or break down pelvic adhesions, although massage and physical therapy may help stretch and loosen adhesions, mobilizing organs. Surgery is currently the only treatment that can effectively remove adhesions. A problem with this treatment, however, is that surgery itself can contribute to the formation of new adhesions. For this reason it requires a high level of expertise and special techniques to surgically treat adhesions while minimizing the risk of recurrence.

Treating adhesions in patients with endometriosis

Adhesion surgery techniques

Regardless of the cause of your adhesions, various techniques can be used to remove adhesions, restore your pelvic anatomy, alleviate adhesion-related pain and prevent recurrence.

Adhesiolysis
Adhesion barriers
Ovarian suspension
Early Second Look Laparoscopy
Patient assisted laparoscopy

Hope for women with adhesion-related pain

If you think you may be suffering from adhesion-related pain, there is hope! Expert laparoscopic removal of your adhesions combined with the careful use of adhesion barriers and, if indicated, an early second look procedure can help provide long-term relief and prevent recurrence.

Summary
Article Name
Adhesiolysis
Description
At the Vital Health we have successfully treated hundreds of patients with severe adhesions, and for some their surgery was not only life changing but life saving.

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Summary
Article Name
Adhesiolysis
Description
At the Vital Health we have successfully treated hundreds of patients with severe adhesions, and for some their surgery was not only life changing but life saving.